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Designers Explain Why Apple's New OS X Typeface Is a Strange Choice

Jun 15 2014 at 03:17 AM •

Designers Explain Why Apple’s New OS X Typeface Is a Strange Choice

It was one of the more subtle changes showcased during yesterday’s WWDC keynote : Apple finally ditched its OS typeface Lucida Grande to use Helvetica Neue across the board. Now, at least the OS and iOS systems match. But is Helvetica—which is basically unreadable at small sizes—really a better choice?

The slim, unfussy Helvetica Neue is a spot-on pick for the new OS design in several ways: It is clean and uncomplicated, which aligns perfectly with the quest for flatness that pervades the new interface and icons. And it is a typeface that certainly imbues sophistication and timelessness upon its content—it’s a classic font, historically embraced by designers, that has been around for decades. It’s pretty!

But when it comes to using it on a computer, especially for type that’s smaller than a headline, designers seem to agree that Helvetica Neue is a poor choice. “It’s just a bad interface typeface,” says Frank Chimero. “Low contrast in letterforms, similar shapes between them, at that. Tough to differentiate at small sizes.”

Legendary type designer Erik Spiekermann probably explains it best with this essay on Helvetica’s problems (bluntly titled “Helvetica sucks”): “It really wasn’t designed for small sizes on screens. Words like mil­li­liter can be very dif­fi­cult to deci­pher. If you ever had to read or write a pass­word with 1, i, l, or I, you know the problem.”

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Helvetica also wasn’t designed with web functionality in mind. “The use in dropdown menus and buttons doesn’t feel as clear and clickable in Helvetica Neue as it did in Lucida Grande,” says Stuart Sandler. “The same can be said for Twitter’s change to Gotham Narrow which is otherwise a great font but in practice makes Twitter feeds feel less ‘readable’ and more sterile and directional.”

All of this is a pretty big issue, especially when you consider that Helvetica Neue is being used on the teeny tiny screen of a phone. Apple even knows this is a problem because there’s a fix built-in to iOS: You can go into your Accessibility settings and switch to “Bold Text,” which will toggle your type from Helvetica Neue Ultra Light to Helvetica Neue Light.

But why should that even have to be an option? Why not pick one font that works well no matter what the weight?

No one seemed to be missing Lucida Grande, but designers were looking for something better—and less ubiquitous. “I’m glad Apple’s finally as sick of Lucida Grande as I am,” says Scott Anderson. “But Helvetica Neue is equally predictable and disappointing.” This would have never flown under Steve, says Carl Alviani. “Too obvious, too done. Apple used to make a point of doing the next thing and expecting everyone else to catch up.”

Apparently Apple is working on the next thing: A custom in-house typeface called Apple Sans has been in development for years, according to John Gruber. Why it didn’t feel the need to roll it out now is confusing, says Jason Santa Maria. “If Apple is working on their own typeface, perhaps it’s still in development. Feels odd to switch to something so inferior in the meantime.”

Especially when Apple has already designed fonts in-house, it seems like it would be kind of a priority to have a distinctive typeface, designed for screens , that its biggest competitor can’t use.

And while we’re on the subject of screens, sure, type legibility across the board is going to get better with the advances in Retina displays. But until everyone has Retina displays, you’re going to have a lot of squinty, frustrated Apple users. Helvetica is just not fun to read at small sizes—in books, on posters, or on iPads—and it never will be.

I’m thankful for the consistency across operating systems (although I still don’t understand why iOS was rolling out the changes first—is it like beta testing?) and I’ll be happy for the fresh look on my MacBook Air. But to me, this is more evidence of Apple’s ambivalent relationship with type, which is especially surprising compared to the rigor it brings to its industrial design. Jeff Koromi put it this way: “I love how Apple can buy Beats for $3+ billion but hiring a good typographer seems to be beyond them.” Jason Santa Maria agreed: “It’s tough to argue that Apple cares about typography in their software.”

This all makes me a bit nostalgic for my first Mac. Say what you will about Chicago—that typeface was readable as hell.


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Five incredible iOS 8 features Apple didn’t mention | Cult of Mac

Jun 03 2014 at 02:45 AM •

Five incredible iOS 8 features Apple didn’t mention

Buster Hein (6:25 pm PDT, Jun 2nd)

Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web

Apple add a ton of new features to iOS 8 today and more are surely on the way once new iPhones and iPads are announced, but while Photos, Messaging and Notification Center stole most of the spotlight today, there were a bunch of smaller features Apple didn’t cover.

Better camera tools, battery statistics, new Siri tricks and more were also added to today’s beta. Here’s our hands on preview of five incredible feature Apple didn’t mention in today’s keynote:

Separate exposure and focus points

Popular camera apps like VSCO and Camera+ have had separate focal and exposure points for years, but Apple is finally adding it to iOS 8. Tap where you want to focus and you’ll see a light icon next to the focus box that you can slide up and down to adjust.

Battery usage by app

iOS lets you pinpoint which apps are killing your battery. To find out just head to Settings >> General >> Usage >> Battery Usage

Grey Scale Mode

Apple hides most of the major UI tweaks in the Accessibilities menu and iOS 8 is no exception with the new Grey Scale Mode. Even if you’re not color blind or have another type of visual impairment, the new setting is great because it’s basically the closest you’re going to get to OS X Yosemite’s new Dark Mode.

In Case of Emergency card

One of my worst fears is that I’ll die in horrific crash of some sort and the police won’t know how to contact my parents to pick up the body. Now anyone can figure out how to help out your unconscious body without unlocking your iPhone thanks to the new In Case of Emergency card on the iOS 8 lockscreen that you can be setup in the Health app.

DuckDuckGo for Safari

Google might be the king of search but DuckDuckGo is our engine of choice at Cult of Mac. It’s a pain in the ass to use though if your browser doesn’t integrate with it, but luckily iOS 8 is adding that ability. Turn it on under Settings >> Safari >> Search Engine >> DuckDuckGo.

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Apple Introduces iOS 8 | TechCrunch

Jun 02 2014 at 03:02 PM •

June 2 - 6, 2014

Last year, Apple revealed the biggest change to-date of iOS, the mobile operating system that many of us have been using for years. Now, the true evolution begins. Jony Ive and the iOS team have had plenty of time to listen to feedback and dig deeper into features introduced before Ive ever took control of software. And finally, iOS 8 is here.

We’ve been expecting a new Healthbook application, a broken out iTunes Radio app to stand on its own, and maybe even split-screen multitasking on the iPad. Will all these dreams come true?

Let’s find out together.

We’ll be updating this article as more and more is announced, so please refresh as the story is still developing.

A few big overviews they showed off first:

Notifications Center is quite a bit different. It includes a new interactive notifications feature to let you swipe down to reply immediately to a message, and that extends all the way out to the lockscreen. It looks a lot like the interactive notifications from OS X Mavericks.

You can also find your favorite contacts by double-tapping to multitask. This gives you quick access to the people you talk to the most.

In Safari, you can get to tab view by clicking the “Tab View” button in the top right corner on the iPad, which comes direct from the new Yosemite version of OS X.

Plus, there are new Mail features which let you use gestures to go directly from a message you’re composing to your inbox, by simply swiping down. This lets you check things out while you’re in the middle of a draft, and then you can pop right back in to the message you were drafting by tapping at the bottom of the screen.

QuickType is a new version of the keyboard in iOS 8. The keyboard finally supports keyword auto-suggestions to let you autofill quickly. It’s context-sensitive, so it offers up words based on what you’ve already typed.

Plus, it also knows who you’re talking to, which is crazy. By knowing who you’re talking to, it will send up predictions that are right for the type of conversation you have with that particular person. It makes a big difference if you’re texting with your boss or your boyfriend.

Continuity is a new part of Apple’s entire software ecosystem, extending beyond iOS to OS X Yosemite. The phone, iPad and computer will be aware of each other, and while you’re in the middle of a task, you can switch from one device to the next with a simple prompt.

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While composing an email on your computer, a small icon will come up on the lower left hand side of the iPhone. Swiping up, as you would to open up the camera quickly, you can get directly into that same email draft on your iPhone. The same extends from iPhone to Mac.

You could be composing a text message on your phone, and an Apple computer running Yosemite would automatically add an icon to the dock, prompting you to complete the message on the computer.

Perhaps the most exciting part is that Continuity extends to phone calls , meaning that you can have your phone plugged in on the other side of the house and pick up a phone call on your Mac, using it as a speakerphone. You can place calls from the Mac, too.

iMessage is the most used app on the iPhone, hands down. So they’ve spent some time working on the way we message each other.

With Group Messages, you can name the thread, add and remove people, and set Do Not Disturb on a per-person basis within a thread.

Apple has also added audio messages , which you can send by swiping left on a little beacon on the right of the typing window. You can also respond to a message in the notification center with an audio message simply by raising the phone to your ear. The same beacon offers video messaging and location sharing.

Most importantly, you can set up these audio messages and video messages to self destruct after a certain number of minutes, going head to head with Snapchat in an exciting way. Ephemerality is here. For good, it seems.

Enterprise is also a big focus for Apple, and so iOS has improved iCloud Drive, as well as Device Enrollment and even parts of the Mail app, which will now let you turn on VIP threads, rather than just assigning VIP status to contacts.

Health is something we knew that Apple would focus on, but we didn’t know that “Health” would be the actual name of the app. Just as expected, it’s a centralized place where many health apps can plug in on the back end so that users can have a single hub for all their health data and services.

On the backend, Apple is calling it HealthKit. But it’s not just developers who can build into HealthKit, but health providers and medical institutions.

Family Sharing is a new feature in iOS 8 that lets you sync up all the devices in a single family (must be tied to one credit card) to automatically share media, calendars, reminders, or find my friends. You can also locate people’s devices, which could come in handy for parents with forgetful kids. Or vice versa.

The most crucial part of iOS 8 Family Sharing is that it will help with children who rack up crazy bills are their parents accounts. Now, when a kid tries to make a purchase on iTunes or in the App Store, the parent will get a notification asking for permission. Problem solved.

Photos!

So far, Apple’s Photo Stream has only allowed for 1,000 photos to be stored at a time, requiring that at some point you back everything up to your Mac. Now Apple is offering storage for all your photos and videos in the cloud with access to them from any device, similar to the way that iTunes holds all your music and movies.

And not only do these devices sync edits, photos, and devices, but they have new Smart Editing features that let you do some pretty amazing edits to both Photos and Videos.

And of course, with more photos you need better search. Apple has added a more advanced search within the Photos app that includes auto-suggestions from more recently taken photos, recently viewed, etc.

More broadly, the Photos app generally looks quite different than it has, with more space between photos not unlike the look of Yosemite.

Siri is the closer for iOS 8, and it’s a pretty big one. You can now activate Siri without touching the phone, which I have actually been praying for since she arrived, by simply saying “Hey Siri.” Siri also now has Shazam integration, the ability to purchase content from iTunes, streaming voice recognition, and comes in 22 new dictation languages.

Developers:

There is a lot at the fingertips of developers this year. TouchID is being opened up to third-party developers, and keyboard builders are now allowed to submit to the App Store, meaning Swype may finally be available on the iPhone. They’re also providing APIs for Cameras which gives more manual controls to third-party apps.

And perhaps most exciting, HomeKit. HomeKit is going to be Apple’s smart home platform, letting developers build something central to iOS. Expect to see an even bigger boom in IoT equipment in the home. Once developers get cracking at this, with the help of Siri, you’ll be able to ask your phone to “Get ready for bed,” and simultaneously turn off the lights, turn down the temperature, etc.


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Apple Stock Rises iPhone 6 Rumors - Business Insider

May 31 2014 at 03:45 AM •

People are slowly realizing that Apple’s new iPhone 6, expected in the fall, is going to be so much more massive than iPhone 5, iPhone 5S, and iPhone 5C were — and it’s showing in the stock. Apple stock is nearly at $640 this morning. It started the year at $553 and hit a humbling low of $499 in January 2013 when people began to suggest that maybe Apple was losing its mojo :

Yahoo Finance

Since then, it has become clear that iPhone 6, with its rumored bigger screen, is likely to drive a massive number of phone upgrades.

For years, Samsung has creamed off smartphone customers with its Galaxy S and Note models, which offer a nice big screen. Apple has been smiling through gritted teeth as its users have had to make do with a small-in-hindsight 4-inch screen. Apple has known its sales have been hurt by its small screens for years , and even produced some internal documents fretting over the issue.

We showed you this chart yesterday, which says that 80% or more of current iPhone users are due for a new phone because they’re using old iPhones that are near the end of their useful lives:

UBS believes that will drive a massive buying cycle, and Apple will sell 166 million phones this fiscal year, up from 150 million last year, according to a recent note to investors.

There’s only one variable, and that’s whether Apple will launch a super-large 5.5-inch iPhone in addition to a 4.7-inch model. The larger screen would have it compete more squarely with Samsung’s high-end phones; the smaller one still leaves it a lot smaller than a Samsung. You can see a leaked photo of the 4.7 inch iPhone 6 here.

If the 5.5-inch does happen though, it sounds like Apple may wait until early 2015 to launch it.

Here’s our comparison chart:

Business Insider

SEE ALSO: Here’s The Latest Photo Of Apple’s New iPhone 6… And It’s Green?


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Rumored Split-Screen Multitasking Feature for iOS 8 Not Ready for WWDC Preview - Mac Rumors

May 29 2014 at 01:55 PM •

Rumored Split-Screen Multitasking Feature for iOS 8 Not Ready for WWDC Preview

Thursday May 29, 2014 1:47 pm PDT by Juli Clover The rumored split-screen multitasking feature said to be coming with iOS 8 is still a work in progress and won’t be previewed at Apple’s upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference, according to Brian Chen of the New York Times.

Designed for the iPad Air and possibly a larger-screened iPad to be released in the future, split-screen multitasking would allow two apps to be displayed at the same time on a single screen while in landscape mode. It might also include a feature that allows users to share information like links, images, and text between two apps. Split-screen multitasking concept, not rumor-based

The iPad’s inability to display two apps at once is a lack that Microsoft has used to heavily advertise its Surface tablet , which does have the ability to display multiple apps on the screen at one time.

While the multitasking feature will reportedly not make its debut at WWDC, it is still slated for inclusion in iOS 8. It appears multitasking will be limited to the iPad Air at launch, and it is unclear whether the smaller Retina iPad mini and iPhone might also gain the functionality. Related roundups: iOS 8 , WWDC 2014

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(View all) spyguy10709 3 minutes ago at 01:48 pm This is honestly something that wouldn’t have happened under Steve. That’s the only time I’ll say it – I promise. But honestly… :(:(:( Rating: 1 Positives [ Read All Comments ]


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iPhone 6 with larger, sharper 1704 x 960 resolution screen in testing | 9to5Mac

May 14 2014 at 07:00 AM •

Apple is preparing to release a new iPhone with a larger screen later this year, and while multiple reports have indicated that the screen will be larger, the exact dimensions of the screen and its resolution have so far been guesswork.

Some industry watchers have speculated that Apple could stretch the iPhone software’s interface and retain the iPhone 5s’s screen resolution of 1136 x 640. This approach would allow all iOS software and App Store apps to function normally on the iPhone 6 without work from developers. The downside of this approach would be that the iPhone 6′s display would fall below Steve Jobs’ somewhat arbitrary 300 pixels per inch definition of ‘Retina’ for a phone.

Just like with the transition to the iPhone 4′s Retina display in 2010 and the transition to the iPhone 5′s taller screen in 2012, Apple is preparing major resolution changes for the iPhone 6 that will require software changes by both Apple and developers, according to people briefed on the specifications of the new device…

History of screen changes:

Before discussing the resolution and scaling changes for the next-generation iPhone, it is important to understand the history of the iPhone’s screen. Back in 2007, Apple introduced the original iPhone with a display with a resolution of 320 x 480. That is 320 pixels horizontally and 480 pixels vertically with a diagonal screen size of 3.5-inches. Apple retained this screen with the succeeding iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS.

In 2010, Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone 4 with Retina display.

The iPhone 4′s screen was much sharper than its predecessors’ displays, but the actual screen size was exactly the same as the previous iPhones. To create this effect, Apple doubled the number of pixels in the display panel and doubled the pixel density of the graphics across iOS in each direction in order to create a sharper screen with the same physical button sizes across the system. The new resolution was 640 x 960, which is double the prior iPhone’s resolution on both axes.

The move from the iPhone 3GS to the iPhone 4 doubled the iPhone screen’s pixel density from 163 PPI to 326 PPI, and Apple claims that a display density over 300 PPI is considered “Retina” quality. With the move to the Retina display, iOS automatically rendered text and core system elements at the new “2X” resolution, but both Apple and third-party App Store developers were required to redesign all of their graphics in order for the images to appear sharp. Otherwise, the smaller images would render at two times their actual size, which would cause a pixelated effect.

In late-2012 with the iPhone 5, Apple enlarged the iPhone’s panel to 4-inches diagonally.

Apple retained the iPhone 4′s horizontal resolution of 640, but it increased the height of the iPhone 5 to 1136 pixels on the vertical axis , a story we broke almost exactly two years ago this month. The same 2X scaling mode from the iPhone 4′s Retina display technology was retained as was the density of 326 pixels-per-inch.

From a developer’s perspective, the current iPhone 5/5s/5c display has a resolution of 568 x 320, up from 480 x 320 in the original iPhone. However, there are actually twice as many pixels in each direction to create a sharper image. In other words, an iPhone 5s with a non-Retina (or “1X”) display would have an actual resolution of 568 x 320 (which is the 1136 x 640 resolution divided by 2). We’ll call this the “base resolution” of the iPhone 5/5s/5c.

3X mode:

Fast forward to 2014, and Apple is preparing to make another significant screen adjustment to the iPhone. Instead of retaining the current resolution, sources familiar with the testing of at least one next-generation iPhone model say that Apple plans to scale the next iPhone display with a pixel-tripling (3X) mode.

This means that Apple will likely be tripling the aforementioned “base resolution” (568 x 320) of the iPhone screen in both directions, and that the iPhone screen resolution will be scaled with an increase of 150% from the current 2X resolution of 1136 x 640. Of course, Apple tests several different iPhones and display technologies , so it is possible that Apple chooses to take another route for display specifications for the 2014 iPhone upgrade.

1704 likely the new 1136:

568 tripled is 1704 and 320 tripled is 960 , and sources indicate that Apple is testing a 1704 x 960 resolution display for the iPhone 6. Tripling the iPhone 5′s base resolution would mean that the iPhone 6′s screen will retain the same 16:9 aspect ratio as the iPhone 5, iPhone 5s, and iPhone 5c.

Previously leaked iPhone 6 schematics from Foxconn indicate that the display will remain 16:9, and this further lends credence to the aforementioned resolution being in testing. This image shows a 16:9 iPhone screenshot overlaid onto the schematics:

Based on the new resolution and evidence from leaked iPhone 6 parts , it seems like the new iPhone’s display will be both taller and slightly wider. This is in comparison to the iPhone 4′s screen size not changing during the transition to Retina and 2X mode and the iPhone 5′s transition to the taller, but not wider, 4-inch screen.

Denser screens:

While the new iPhone’s resolution is certainly higher, the screen’s overall sharpness is based on the screen’s pixel density. The two most commonly discussed diagonal screen sizes for the next iPhone are 4.7-inches and 5.5-inches. Here’s what the pixel densities would be for both of those screen sizes assuming each uses the new 3X scaling mode and 1704 x 960 resolution:

4.7-inches diagonal would feature a display density of 416 PPI:

5.5-inches diagonal would feature a display density of 356 PPI :

So, regardless of whether Apple goes with a 4.7-inch or 5.5-inch panel—or both—the new iPhone(s) will have significantly more dense screens in comparison to current and past iPhones, which will result in crisper text, images, and video for users of the next-generation Apple smartphones. Also, by definition, both screens will have pixel densities that fit comfortably within Apple’s threshold for a “Retina” display.

Larger iOS interface:

The larger and denser next-generation iPhone display means that iOS’s user-interface will become slightly larger and sharper unless Apple re-architects the layout of iOS to become more optimized for the new screen. The mockup images created by9to5‘s Michael Steeber above and below demonstrate raw pixel scale between the iPhone 5/5s/5c’s 640 x 1136 resolution display and the iPhone 6′s probable 960 x 1704 resolution screen.

The sources say that core user interface elements, from iOS functions like the Home screen, Notification Center, and Settings panels, will simply appear like larger versions of those functions on the current iPhone display. However, sources also say it is likely that developers and Apple itself will be able to optimize some applications to better utilize the larger screen area. It is possible Apple could revamp the Home screen and other functions between now and this fall’s launch.

For example, it would make sense for Apple to allow for applications like Safari and Maps to better take advantage of the new screen space. Game developers may choose to reposition their controls for an improved gaming experience. This screen size shift varies from the transition from the iPhone 4/4S to the iPhone 5/5s/5c, which simply entailed making the screen taller. This allowed Apple to show more new messages in Mail and add another row of Home screen icons.

iOS Simulator:

To test how iOS 7 would react to the 3X resolution mode for the next iPhone model, prominent developer Steven Troughton-Smith modified the publicly available iOS Simulator application used for App Store software development. The screenshots displayed in the above mockups are sourced from that modified simulator. As can be seen in the images above, core system functions like Spotlight and the Home screen scale fairly well automatically, but applications like Calendar will need some new graphics under the hood. Apple is said to be (unsurprisingly) working on optimizing all graphics across iOS to fit the new 3X mode, so customers will experience sharp graphics across the new device. If you click the above images, you can download them in the full 1704 x 960 resolution.

Developer transition:

Back in 2010 when Apple began the transition from the standard iPhone display to the Retina display, iOS’s user-interface aesthetic was driven by Steve Jobs’ and Scott Forstall’s taste in “skeuomorphic” design. This meant a casino and green felt-themed Game Center app, a yellow legal pad-styled Notes app, and a Calendar app bound by faux leather. Now, in 2014, Apple’s iOS design is led by Jony Ive, and features more prominent content, clear text, vector graphics , and animations.

According to developers, the new iOS design aesthetic’s reduced reliance on “raster” graphics means that apps can more easily be updated (or even be automatically updated) for the next iPhone’s denser, larger display panel. To prove this, Troughton-Smith tested two of his iPhone applications on the modified iPhone simulator to see how they would run. Speed (shown right) seems to run almost perfectly without any changes. Grace (shown left), another app of Troughton-Smith’s, also worked on the new display without any updates.

But, of course, not all apps will automatically run with a sharp look on the iPhone 6. According to sources familiar with the new iPhone displays in testing, if an unoptimized iPhone 5 app is run on the iPhone 6, the app will fill the entire screen but the non-3X images within the app will be blurrier. Troughton-Smith’s applications scale well because they were built with vector graphics. This transition from 2X to 3X will be reminiscent to the transition from 1X to 2X when the first iPhones with Retina displays launched in 2010.

_Multi-resolution tools: _

Apple has been working on a new “multi-resolution” mode and developer toolset for future iOS devices that allows developers to more easily scale their applications to work on multiple new iOS device resolutions. It is likely that developers will be provided with these tools later this year so that they can begin work on optimizing apps (if even necessary) for the new iPhone’s display. Apple typically does not preview new hardware features months in advance, so Apple is unlikely to reveal the larger iPhone display size at WWDC early next month.

Stronger chip:

Sources also say that Apple has developed a new A8 system-on-a-chip for the next iPhone that focuses on marginal speed improvements rather than core architectural changes, but adds significant performance and efficiency enhancements in order to improve the iPhone’s battery life. With a larger, higher-resolution display combined with the next iPhone’s far thinner body , the A8 chip will be essential to maintaining the seamless, fluid iPhone experience that Apple prides itself on. Besides a new processor, it is likely that the new iPhone will include improved LTE components for voice-over-LTE support and various other new hardware elements.

Future Apple devices:

Apple’s new hardware- and software-based display technologies likely opens up the door for a flurry of future, higher-resolution iOS devices.

Noted analyst Ming-Chi Kuo previously indicated that Apple is working on a sharper full-size iPad, so perhaps in the same way that Apple transitioned the iPhone to 2X before the iPad, the new 3X iPhone resolution will be a precursor to improved iPad displays.

Apple is also on working on some secret new iOS device form factors, high-resolution external monitors, and wearable displays, so perhaps these new technologies play into those future hardware products as well.

iOS 8 features and WWDC:

Before introducing fresh iPhone hardware later this year, Apple will use the WWDC stage in June to discuss the next iPhone’s operating system, iOS 8. In addition to building in support for the new hardware, the new operating system features a slew of enhancements , applications , and refinements.

New applications in iOS 8 likely include a Healthbook app for tracking health and fitness data , an enhanced Maps app with public transit directions support , and a standalone iTunes Radio app. Other enhancements, including a new split-screen multitasking view for the iPad, will round-out the feature-set.

Sources say that Apple is seriously considering pushing back some of iOS 8′s functionality to iOS 8.1 or even later versions of iOS, including the transit mode in the Maps app.

Regardless of what Apple announces, we’ll be covering WWDC extensively and looking out for more clues to what features the next iPhone will include. The latest reports indicate that Apple is preparing to launch a 4.7-inch iPhone model in August and a larger, “phablet” model with a 5.5-inch screen in September.

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2 Responses to “iPhone 6 with larger, sharper 1704 x 960 resolution screen in testing”

  1. Sam (@samtf1) says: May 14, 2014 at 6:51 am

Nice “iPhone 6″ mock up at the top there, with the bezel wider on the left than the right…

Reply
1. SleptOn (@JxSleptOn) says: May 14, 2014 at 6:54 am

They really need to do something with the missed notifications column. Completely useless. Widgets?

Reply


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Eight things you should know about the next iPhone | The Verge

May 13 2014 at 04:56 AM •

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For a company famed for its tight-lipped secrecy, Apple’s flagship products have a surprisingly strong track record for leaking essentially in their entirety. The Wall Street Journal has a long-standing history of pre-event leaks, 9to5Mac is remarkably well-sourced, and everyone from suppliers to Best Buy employees provide a steady stream of just-plausible-enough rumors leaking out over the months running up to the launch of a new device. From the iPhone 5S to the iPad Air, few Apple devices have been a true surprise in the last few years.

It all means that, even weeks or months before Tim Cook takes it out of his pocket or an envelope or makes it appear out of thin air, we might already have a pretty good idea of what the next iPhone is going to look like. Rumors are flying fast and furious, but there are some that are both so substantiated and so consistent that they’re harder than ever to discredit. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.

Of course, nothing is certain until it’s certain, and Apple does tend to keep at least a few things hidden. But here’s the most likely and interesting of what the rumor mill is telling us about the next iPhone.

iPhone 6 concept render by Martin Hajek.

There’s probably more than one “next iPhone.” Rumors have it that there will be two new models as Apple responds to the massive demand for bigger phones. The exact size has been heavily debated, but most sources have come to believe that one upcoming iPhone will have a 4.7-inch screen, the other a 5.5. Supposedly leaked cases (most of which look more like mockups than the real thing) show a model that looks a lot like the latest iPod touch or the iPad Air.

The handsets depicted would be thinner than ever (as little as 6 millimeters thick ), with a rounded look rather than the squared sides on the 5S. One particularly popular photo shows gold, silver, and space gray models, each with an aluminum back broken up only by two horizontal stripes for the antennas instead of glass on the top and bottom.

Apple’s new sapphire production processes could mean the new iPhones could have new types of displays in addition to new lenses and buttons. At least one reputable source says they’ll have curved displays, too, but that’s debated all over.

Apple’s history says the 5S will remain on sale, and there’s no indication so far that Apple’s even replacing it with an updated, device of the same size. It’s possible both new models will be larger, and anyone looking for a 4-inch iPhone will still be buying the 5S. No word yet on what will happen to the colorful 5C, though it seems the likeliest candidate for Apple’s free option.

The possible three colors of iPhone 6, in dummy form, first reported by 9to5Mac.

It might be more expensive. At least one analyst says that Apple is currently negotiating to raise the base price of the iPhone to $299 with a two-year contract. Apparently carriers have thus far said no, but in a market where many people feel like innovation has slowed down, Apple could have the hit of the year in store — and that may give it the leverage it needs to charge whatever it wants.

At least one could come early. Apple’s huge developer conference, WWDC, is less than a month away. For years, that was the stage for Apple to announce its latest iPhone, and many are wondering if this year will be a return to form. Here, the rumors and speculation are torn: some analysts and suppliers say WWDC is the reveal date for the new iPhone, others have posited it will be in August instead. Some say Apple is dealing with production issues on the larger model, which could push its release back as far as early 2015. But either way, it looks likely that we’ll be seeing at least one new iPhone a little bit earlier than we thought.

It’s probably called the iPhone 6. That’s not exactly a controversial guess, and Apple does have some history in naming differently sized products the same thing, as with the MacBook Air. But it’s not impossible that Apple will repeat what it did with the iPad, eschewing the number scheme for names like Air and Mini. It’s hardly going to call either of the largest iPhones ever “the iPhone Mini,” but even though iPhone 6 is the only name being discussed don’t be surprised to hear Tim Cook call it something new.

It might have an amazing new camera. It’s the feature everyone talks most about, and Apple’s always put huge resources behind improving its cameras. Its latest move was to hire Ari Partinen , the Nokia engineer behind the Lumia cameras — though he’s too new to the company to make huge changes just yet.

More pressingly, Apple’s filed a patent for a particular kind of image stabilization in a smartphone; it will reportedly increase the size of the pixels in its 8-megapixel sensor; and apparently there’s a “ Super Resolution Mode ” in the next version of the camera app. Of course, cameras are where virtually every manufacturer over-brands and under-delivers, so this could be an aggressive name for a simple new feature, but the prevailing wisdom seems to be that Apple is working on something remarkable for the next iPhone.

It will do even more with your fingerprint. Apple has almost 800 million iTunes accounts and hundreds of millions of credit cards on file, and all signs point to a larger option for users to buy things on their phone. It would take on PayPal and Google Wallet, and could launch alongside the new iPhone. TouchID would be Apple’s smoking gun — paying for everything online with your fingerprint is both secure and simple, and a “Pay with iTunes” of sorts could be a huge revenue driver for Apple.

It will come with a new version of iOS. iOS 8 is almost certain to be announced at WWDC, and appears likely to come with a number of new features along with a continued refinement of the new design introduced with iOS 7. Healthbook is the flagship new feature, using the many sensors purported to be in the new device — which could measure everything from pressure to humidity — to tell you how many steps you took or even (apparently) your blood-oxygen levels. Siri stands to gain some new tricks, including the Shazam-aided ability to tell you what song is playing. And Apple Maps might finally be getting public transport information, as it continues its slow road out of its terrible beginnings.

We might see a few new apps in iOS 8, too. A text editor and a Preview app for viewing documents and images have both been leaked in apparently early iterations, and both make sense for the platform. iTunes Radio might be broken out as a separate app, too, to better promote Apple’s streaming music service.

It might work with a smartwatch. Healthbook is a natural way for iOS to collect data from the ever-rumored iWatch, which many have speculated is going to be a primarily health-focused device anyway. And some leaked screenshots have shown a “ Watch Utility ” app, though there’s almost no chance that the leaked name or app icon are final.

The iWatch has become thought of more and more as a companion to the iPhone, rather than a single standalone device. It seems logical that Apple would announce the two at the same time, though given how long “the Apple smartwatch” has been the unicorn of consumer electronics, it’s still far from a safe bet.

Rumors about larger iPhones have been flowing for months, speculation about an Apple smartwatch for even longer. But they’ve recently hit a fever pitch that tends to only occur right before rumors become reality. All signs point to big new things from Apple in the next few months. Tim Cook promised Apple is “ closer than ever ” to a new product category, and if he’s ready to launch both two new iPhones and a new smartwatch, Apple’s product lineup might soon look very different than it does today.

At this point, nothing’s certain. Apple tests many products it never releases, and there’s often a very fine line between a leak and a guess. But for years, all the information you needed to find out what Apple has been up to has been available, as long as you knew where to look. This year, as ever, there are plenty of question marks left, but Apple’s next big moves are coming rapidly into focus.

Jake Kastrenakes contributed to this report.


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20 Awesome App Design Freebies

May 06 2014 at 04:04 PM •

20 Awesome App Design Freebies

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App design is on a rising trend these days! Lots of popular websites also have their own apps created to attract more readers and visitors. If you’re a designer, then these awesome app design freebies will be very useful for you! These will save you a lot of time in your design process and also will inspire you to create even more beautiful apps! Check them out!

Music app concept

This is a music app concept inspired by the iOS7 user interface look. PSD and PNG are attached.

Instagram app UI concept

Here’s a redesigned UI concept for Instagram app. Free PSD created and released by Karl O’Brien.

iOS7 vintage music player

Here is a vintage music player app concept for iOS7. Free PSD designed and released by David Pacilio.

Book app template

Here is a book app template with star rating system and including FontAwesome icons.

Kickstarter – Dark UI kit for apps

Kickstarter is a dark UI starter kit for designing apps. It has a very clean and modern design.

Social app concept

Here is an elegant social app concept design. Free PSD designed and released by Olia Gozha on Dribbble. The idea was to create user profile for app which allows people to share photos + audios which inspired them to make these photos.

iPhone calendar concept

Here is an interesting iPhone calendar design concept including clock and weather widget. Psd is also available.

Facebook iOS Menu

This is a free PSD Facebook menu for the well-known iOS app. Hope you can find some use for it!

Sightsy – A PSD app for iOS7

Sightsy is an iOS7 app designed by Rick Waalders. The author shared the original PSD project with the dribbble community. It can be really useful for your inspiration.

Viber for iOS7

This reebie is an iOS7 version of Viber. Credits to original icon-makers! You can download the free PSD file!

Profile app

This freebie on dribbble is a profile page for an app that you can use for inspiration.

Instagrapp free

This is an experimental Instagrapp app UI available for you for free! Get the files now!

Email app template

This is an awesome flat style email app template. It has a clean, flat design style. You can get the fully editable PSD files for free!

App fold navigation free

This app navigation menu conceived for folding just in the middle! Looks great and it is unique!

iGlass – Future camera app UI

This free PSD is amazing! iGlass is the camera app of the future. Behzad Ghaffarian has invented this stunning UI for a futuristic iPhone.

Layers iPhone App Interface

This extensive free PSD contains fifteen different interface screens for a fictional iPhone application — Layers. These include a welcome screen, settings page, feedback screen, upload forms, and “browse” screens.

Chat messages GUI

These are some chat message bubbles for mobile apps. It contains a rounded profile image and a minimal bubble with the message text.

New Spotify iOS app UI

This is the proposal for redesigning Spotify iOS app. Maybe this free PSD can be useful for inspiration!

iOS music app concept

This is a music app user interface for iOS. It’s a delightful starting point for building out a complete application.

Stats view app concept

Here is the concept of an iOS7 Stats app including a view that contains a coloured but simple pie chart.


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iOS 7.1.1 Battery Life Improved on iPhone | BGR

Apr 25 2014 at 03:38 AM •

Good news, Apple fans! It looks like Apple’s recent iOS 7.1.1 update has plenty more to offer than just a few bug fixes and Touch ID accuracy improvements. According to some reports, Apple’s latest mobile software update also has a huge positive impact on iPhone battery life.

Apple released iOS 7.1.1 for compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch models this past Tuesday, and the change log was pretty lackluster:

- Further improvements to Touch ID fingerprint recognition
- Fixes a bug that could impact keyboard responsiveness
- Fixes an issue when using Bluetooth keyboards with VoiceOver enabled

As it turns out, however Apple may have also snuck in some sizable software optimizations, because ZDNet’s Adrian Kingsley-Hughes says that the update has had a dramatic impact on his iPhone 5′s battery life.

The writer has been keeping track of battery performance on his iPhone since iOS 6. While his data is obviously unscientific since usage patterns change all the time, observed battery life can still be quite telling.

While running iOS 6, Kingsley-Hughes said six hours of usage would take his iPhone 5′s battery from 100% down to 74%. Apple’s iOS 7 update had a minor negative impact on battery performance at first, but things were back to normal after a short amount of time.

The iOS 7.1 update really hurt the battery performance on Kingsley-Hughes’s iPhone. He says six hours of usage on iOS 7.1 would take his charge from 100% to as little as 48%.

With Apple’s new iOS 7.1.1 update, however, the writer says that his iPhone’s battery now has about 76% of its charge remaining after six hours of average use on a fully charged iPhone 5. That’s even better than his battery performance was on iOS 6.

Of note, BGR has also noticed some battery performance improvements on an iPhone 5s running iOS 7.1.1, though they haven’t been quite as dramatic as the improvement observed by Kingsley-Hughes.

Want to improve your battery life even more? Here are 15 tips for squeezing as much battery life as possible out of your iPhone.

iOS 7.1.1 brings huge battery life improvements for iPhone users

mobile

Good news, Apple fans! It looks like Apple’s recent iOS 7.1.1 update has plenty more to offer than just a few bug fixes and Touch ID accuracy improvements. According to some reports, Apple’s latest mobile software update also has a huge positive impact on iPhone battery life.

Apple released iOS 7.1.1 for compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch models this past Tuesday , and the change log was pretty lackluster:

  • Further improvements to Touch ID fingerprint recognition

  • Fixes a bug that could impact keyboard responsiveness

  • Fixes an issue when using Bluetooth keyboards with VoiceOver enabled

As it turns out, however Apple may have also snuck in some sizable software optimizations, because ZDNet’s Adrian Kingsley-Hughes says that the update has had a dramatic impact on his iPhone 5′s battery life.

The writer has been keeping track of battery performance on his iPhone since iOS 6. While his data is obviously unscientific since usage patterns change all the time, observed battery life can still be quite telling.

While running iOS 6, Kingsley-Hughes said six hours of usage would take his iPhone 5′s battery from 100% down to 74%. Apple’s iOS 7 update had a minor negative impact on battery performance at first, but things were back to normal after a short amount of time.

The iOS 7.1 update really hurt the battery performance on Kingsley-Hughes’s iPhone. He says six hours of usage on iOS 7.1 would take his charge from 100% to as little as 48%.

With Apple’s new iOS 7.1.1 update, however, the writer says that his iPhone’s battery now has about 76% of its charge remaining after six hours of average use on a fully charged iPhone 5. That’s even better than his battery performance was on iOS 6.

Of note, BGR has also noticed some battery performance improvements on an iPhone 5s running iOS 7.1.1, though they haven’t been quite as dramatic as the improvement observed by Kingsley-Hughes.

Want to improve your battery life even more? Here are 15 tips for squeezing as much battery life as possible out of your iPhone.


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Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with improvements to Touch ID, keyboard

Apr 22 2014 at 10:15 AM •

BreakingBy AppleInsider Staff

Apple on Tuesday released iOS 7.1.1, a minor update for its mobile operating system that’s intended to address a few bugs, including an issue that could affect keyboard responsiveness, while also further improving the performance of the iPhone 5s Touch ID fingerprint sensor. iOS 7.1.1 is now available through Software Update in the Settings application on an iPhone or iPad. Documentation accompanying the update says it contains “improvements, bug fixes and security updates.”

Apple has said that iPhone 5s owners will also see further improvements to Touch ID fingerprint recognition after installing the update — something the company has continuously done since the launch of the handset last year. The update is also said to fix an issue that could arise when using Bluetooth keyboards while VoiceOver is enabled.

The latest iOS update follows March’s release of iOS 7.1 , a significant upgrade that addressed a number of issues that had lingered since last fall’s debut of iOS 7. In particular, iOS 7.1 fixed a number of crash-related issues that iPhone and iPad users were experiencing while using the multitasking view and browsing the web in Safari. iOS 7.1 also brought improvements for Siri and Touch ID, and also set the stage for the launch of CarPlay in supported vehicles and aftermarket install kits later this year.

As for the next major update to iOS, Apple is expected to introduce its eight-generation mobile operating system at the company’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference. The conference will kick off on June 2 , likely with a keynote presentation to formally unveil iOS 8, along with any other products the company may have in the works.


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About tewfiq

I’m a Creative Technologist in Paris, France

You should follow me. Download Koolyoom: Snap to Discover

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